Cyberbullying

Preventing Cyberbullying at Workplace

Cyberbullying is prevalent in the US and chances are one or more of your employees can be bullied at some point. The problem with cyberbullying at the workplace is that unless you’re at the receiving end, you might not realize how serious the problem is.

Often lack of awareness about cyberbullying and failing to monitor employee activity prevents organizations from realizing that they have a bully. Remember things can get serious if there’s an element of personal shame involved.

Workplace Bullying is Costly for Employers as Well
Workers who are bullied sink into a really bad emotional shape. They find it difficult to work and this affects their job performance. Often businesses don’t realize that their workers are being bullied until it’s too late.

As stated earlier, workplace bullying is costly for the employees as well as the employers. Employees who are targeted are more likely to suffer from health problems and stress and this ultimately takes a toll on their work performance. Remember your business reputation can be seriously hurt if the word about cyberbullying gets around.

Another important thing you need keep in mind is that employees who are bullied can leave your organization or remain absent for extended period of time. Eventually the employee will start feeling miserable and decide to quit the company for good.

Workers can cause personal calls and text messages to bully fellow employees. Making critical comments about someone’s work or appearance over text messages and sending obnoxious emails qualify as cyberbullying. It is also seen that bullying victims do not tell their stories to human resources, their managers and even colleagues and this puts them under a great deal of stress. Unfortunately complaining about the bully leads to revengeful hurting or public shaming and knowing this, targets are reluctant to raise their voice.

What employers need to understand is that bullying fellow workers via emails, calls and inappropriate text messages is a form of violence and abuse. Of course no company wants bullying to happen, but the reason workplace bullying has become so common is that it goes unnoticed unlike other serious offences like sexual harassment or racial discrimination.

Bullying is a workplace issue, but sometimes it’s extremely difficult to know if bullying is happening at the office or after working hours. That’s right. Sometimes workers can continue to bother colleagues after working hours. They might use text messages and even social media to spread rumors and other objectionable content just to humiliate, degrade, offend and intimidate the other person. Even cyberbullying can involve some form of physical contract, but this is not always necessary.

Perhaps the most shocking thing about cyberbullying at workplace is that the act of aggression can be obvious and it can also be subtle. As a responsible employer, you should track the use of phones and mobile devices so that co-workers do not spread malicious gossip, rumors or any other information that is not true.

Constantly insulting a person on social media is not acceptable and this includes making jokes or other inappropriate comments by email. By monitoring emails, calls and text messages you would know that if a person is criticizing a coworker purposely.

The bottom line is that monitoring employee’s use of phones and mobile devices can help create a healthy workplace that is free of cyberbullying. Using spy listening devices for cell phones will help you combat increased turnover, increased stress, decreased employee productivity, increased turnover and tarnished corporate image and this will help you improve business performance.

In addition to defining strict laws about workplace bullying and sexual harassment in clear language, you need to have employee activity monitoring to eliminate cyberbullying from workplace for good.

 

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